Institutional Effectiveness Summary Report 2006

Institutional Effectiveness Model

Technologically skilled workforce

Reporting Components
The cycle for reporting the institutional effectiveness components to the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education for Tri-County Technical College is as follows: 

  1. General Education - Four-Year Cycle 
  2. Majors or Concentrations - One-Year Cycle 
  3. Academic Advising - Four-Year Cycle 
  4. Achievement of Students Transferring from Two- to Four-Year Institutions - Two-Year Cycle 
  5. Procedures for Student Development - Four-Year Cycle 
  6. Library Resources - Four-Year Cycle 
  7. Technologically Skilled Workforce - One-Year Cycle

Institutional Effectiveness Model:

Mission

Tri-County Technical College is a public, two-year community college dedicated to serving as a catalyst for the economic and lifelong development of the citizens of Anderson, Oconee, and Pickens Counties through outstanding programs and unparalleled service. An open admissions institution with primary focus on teaching and learning, the College serves approximately 6,000 to 7,000 students through both on-campus and distance learning courses. The College grants certificates, diplomas, and associate degrees in technical, career, and transfer programs. The College also offers certificates in Corporate & Community Education programs.

  

Tri-County Technical College?s Institutional Effectiveness Policy and Institutional Effectiveness Procedure state that the College ??will engage in ongoing, integrated, and research-based planning and evaluation processes that include periodic reviews of all programs and services...? and that are ??designed to ensure continuous improvement and success in achieving the College?s mission.? In addition, the College is ??committed to the integration of institutional effectiveness data into strategic planning at all levels of operation?? and ??will organize its human, physical and fiscal resources to carry out assessment, research, and planning processes.?

 

Assessment

Systematic and ongoing assessment at Tri-County Technical College supports continuous improvement in all major areas of the Institution. The processes include broad-based participation of faculty, staff, students, administration, and external stakeholders, and the resulting information is used by all units of the College to improve. Principal assessment activities include:

•·        academic and administrative & educational support services program outcomes

•·        institutional core indicators

•·        student course/instructor evaluations

•·        student, graduate, and employer surveys

•·        academic program reviews

Research

The Research and Evaluation Department is responsible for assisting individuals and committees on campus who are involved in planning and decision making by gathering external and internal data appropriate to the need. The Department is responsible for presenting the data in a useful format and posting the results for the College community, if appropriate, and the timelines for ongoing data-gathering processes.


Planning

Planning at Tri-County Technical College occurs at both the College and the unit levels. The planning process is coordinated by the Institutional Advancement Division in coordination with a college-wide strategic planning committee. The Division is responsible for developing a process that includes the use of assessment data gathered through formal processes and a review of pertinent external data to improve the College and make institutional changes. The committee is responsible for carrying out the process with assistance from the Division. In addition, the Division holds a Budgeting/Planning workshop in coordination with the Business Department to train employees on the process and to emphasize the relationship between budgeting and planning and the use of data and analysis in the planning process. All plans and budgets are required to have approval from appropriate supervisors and are then presented to the President by appropriate Vice Presidents and Deans for approval. The Institutional Advancement Division is responsible for developing and posting templates, timelines, and completed plans for the College community.

College Strategic Plan The College?s 2005-2008 Strategic Plan is designed to define the College?s mission, vision, and values and to identify actions to be taken on large college-wide initiatives that address priorities required to move the College forward and respond to assessment findings. Annually, before the budgeting process begins, the Strategic Planning Committee reviews the long-term initiatives and priorities to determine if they are still appropriate or if they need to be modified to reflect changing internal or external conditions. The Strategic Planning Committee makes recommendations to the Executive Staff, and the President again assigns areas of responsibility. Vice presidents, in collaboration with faculty and staff within the perspective unit, develop annual plans.

Institutional Plans ? Strategic and Operational Planning at the Unit Level Institutional Plans are annual unit-level plans for all areas of the College?Institutional Advancement, Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, Business Affairs (includes equipment, facilities, financial, and information technology), and Corporate & Community Education. These plans include the mission of the unit as it relates to the College?s mission and activities that have been assigned from the College Strategic Plan that respond to weaknesses and address new programs or services needed for continuous effectiveness in the future of the unit. Every five to eight years, the College works with a consultant to develop a long-term master facilities plan. Out of this comes an annual capital improvement plan, which is a part of the Business Affairs Institutional Plan.

Evidence of Continuous Improvement

The College?s institutional effectiveness process is also continually being assessed. The addition of a new Program Review process, the Academic and Administrative & Educational Support Services Outcomes Process, a recently revised Institutional Effectiveness Policy and Procedure, and a new planning process for the new planning period are evidence that the College is dedicated to continuous improvement of the institutional effectiveness process.

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Technologically skilled workforce:

Tri-County Technical College is dedicated to providing a technologically skilled workforce. This is accomplished in multiple ways.

Technology Use in Teaching and Learning

The College is committed to the use of technology as an integral component of classroom and laboratory instruction. In addition to program-specific software, faculty use technology to enhance the teaching and learning environment. Chief among the instructional technologies used are (1) web-based systems: the College Intranet (Campus Pipeline), WebCT (course management system used for both distance learning delivery and on-campus course supplements), and the Academic Web (instructor and department web pages); and (2) classroom-based technology, such as presentation systems and SMARTboards. To assist faculty in fully integrating technology into instruction the College provides support through the Instructional Support Department, which directly assists faculty in developing and delivering technology-rich learning materials for both on-campus and distance learning courses. The staff provides consultation in on-line course design, web page development, WebCT, and other software packages used to create learning materials; facilitates a Teaching with Technology workshop series in conjunction with Faculty/Staff Development; and maintains a number of resources to aid faculty in utilizing technology in their classes. Additionally, the annual Master Teacher seminar series includes a session on the pedagogical aspects of integrating technology into instruction.

Appropriate to meeting the objectives of its programs

As an institution with technical degree programs, the College has many curricula that use specialized technology and software to accomplish program objectives. Advisory committee members, comprised of practitioners in the community, assist faculty in keeping abreast of industry standards to ensure that technology is appropriate for meeting individual program objectives. This is evidenced College Advisory Committee Best Practice Forms which reports the number of advisory committees that reviewed and made recommendations on utilization/integration of current technology in existing programs.

Evidence of the appropriateness of program-specific technology use is found in the many technology-related student learning outcomes throughout the curricula. For example:

The Industrial and Engineering Technology Division has 19 Lecture/lab facilities to support instruction and student learning outcomes. Examples include: 1) The Division incorporates many different software applications to enhance student learning. They are specific to the various programs, i.e. Microsoft Office, PLC Programming Software, Simulation software, AutoCAD Inventor, ProEngineering Wildfire, MasterCAM, and LabView. 2) Most classrooms are equipped with projection systems and DVD/VCR equipment. 3) WEBCT is utilized for all the online courses offered within the Division. The equipment budget for the past two years has exceeded

            $500,000.

 

Electronics Engineering Technology examples:

Oscilloscopes, power supplies, and GPIB interface boards purchased in 2004. In 2005 the program is adding a multi-axis CNC machining center to produce circuit boards and other objects. Some examples of existing technologies utilized in the curriculum include Microsoft Office software for written and oral exercises, internet based research projects, DEBUG programming software, Labview software, and various electronic instrumentation to build, test, and repair electronic circuits.

Individual programs, departments, and divisions engage in technology planning through the College planning and budgeting process. Program faculty identify and plan for their specific technology requirements. The technology needs are informed by student learning outcomes and determined through advisory committee recommendations, research done by program faculty, and regional employer contacts. College support of instructional technology for all curricula is evidenced by College budget allocations for division/program equipment, to include technology.

In addition to program-specific student learning outcomes related to the use of technology, the College?s identified general education Core Competency 1.3 states that all students who complete the general education component of their program will be able to ?utilize current communication technologies to present ideas and information.?

To meet the needs of students with multiple life and work responsibilities who are unable to attend regularly scheduled classes on campus, the College offers three degree programs through distance learning technology: Associate in Engineering Technology with a major in Industrial Supervision, Associate in Business with a major in Management, and Associate in Public Service with a major in Criminal Justice Technology. These entire programs, plus numerous other courses, are delivered via the Internet (in addition to also being available in a traditional on-campus format), most through the web-based course management system WebCT. In Fall 2005, the College delivered 96 sections of 61 courses online, with an unduplicated enrollment of 1,030, which represents 22 percent of the college-wide headcount. 

Students and faculty have access to technology in classrooms and labs on campus. The College has successfully connected 100 percent of all classrooms and 85 percent of all instructional labs to the Internet. In addition, classroom presentation systems have been installed in 56 percent of all classrooms and instructional labs.

For many programs on campus, technology training is incorporated into class and/or lab instruction and faculty in these programs are available to provide ?hands-on? assistance to students outside of class/lab time.

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Reporting Components:

  1. General Education: This component was last submitted to the Commission on Higher Education in 2006. Based on the schedule of reporting for this component, a report on general education will be submitted next to the Commission on Higher Education in 2010. The following presents a summary of the results for 2006.

Assessment Methodology: The assessment consists of annually surveying students on the quality of instruction, quality of instructors, and effectiveness of English, humanities/social science, math, and science courses in meeting student needs. In addition, students also provide feedback on the Learning Lab and Writing Center, two support programs designed to provide individual assistance to students in English, math, and science. Since 2001-2002, more than 7,500 students have provided feedback.

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    • Major Findings: The following summarizes the major findings of the assessment of general education. Effectiveness Ratings of 1.00 up to 2.00 equal Very Ineffective, 2.00 up to 3.00 equal Ineffective, 3.00 up to 4.00 equal Effective, and 4.00 to 5.00 equal Very Effective. 
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      • English Courses: Students rate the quality of instruction, quality of instructors, and effectiveness of English courses in meeting their needs. The average mean ratings range from 4.10 to 4.20 (Very Effective) since 2001-2002. The average rating for 2005-2006 was 4.20.
      • Humanities/Social Science Courses: Students rate the quality of instruction, quality of instructors, and effectiveness of humanities/social science courses in meeting their needs. The average mean ratings range from 4.07 to 4.20 (Very Effective) since 2001-2002. The average rating for 2005-2006 was 4.20.

      • Math Courses: Students rate the quality of instruction, quality of instructors, and effectiveness of math courses in meeting their needs. The average mean ratings range from 3.93 to 4.03 (Effective to Very Effective) since 2001-2002. The average rating for 2005-2006 was 4.03.

•·        Science Courses: Students rate the quality of instruction, quality of instructors, and effectiveness of science courses in meeting their needs. The average mean ratings range from 4.10 to 4.17 (Very Effective) since 2001-2002. The average rating for 2005-2006 was 4.10.

•·        Learning Lab: Students rate the availability, quality, and effectiveness of the Learning Lab in meeting their needs. The average mean ratings range from 4.20 to 4.37 (Very Effective) since 2001-2002. The average rating for 2005-2006 was 4.37.

•·        Writing Center: Students rate the availability, quality, and effectiveness of the Writing Center in meeting their needs. The average mean ratings range from 4.13 to 4.37 (Very Effective) since 2001-2002. The average rating for 2005-2006 was 4.37.

•§         Major Initiatives: Based upon the institutional effectiveness findings for general education, the following initiatives have or are being implemented.

•·        The Arts and Sciences Division, in coordination with the employees in the newly formed Tri-County Gateway to College program, worked with area high school department heads to align curriculum in the Gateway courses with the courses currently taught in the high schools.  In addition, work was completed to coordinate the newly designed Gateway curriculum and general education courses that the gateway students will take following the remediation courses.

•·        The Arts and Sciences Division received laptops and projection units to improve the delivery of instruction of general education courses offered on and off campus.

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  1. Majors or Concentrations: This component was last submitted to the Commission on Higher Education in 2006. Based on the schedule of reporting for this component, a report on majors or concentrations will be submitted next to the Commission on Higher Education in 2007. The following presents a summary of the results for 2006.

Assessment Methodology: The assessment consists of annually surveying employers and graduates in all diploma and associate degree technical majors on technical workplace competencies, general workplace competencies, satisfaction with educational experience, and work performance. Since 2001-2002, 918 employers and 1,647 graduates have provided feedback.

Major Findings:
The following summarizes the major findings of the assessment of majors or concentrations. Effectiveness Ratings of 0% up to 85% equal Very Ineffective, 85% up to 90% equal Ineffective, 90% up to 95% equal Effective, and 95% to 100% equal Very Effective.

·        Satisfaction with Educational Experience: 96.4% of graduates indicate satisfaction with their educational experience at Tri-County Technical College with annual ratings from 95.8% to 98.8% since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 96.2% (Very Effective).

·        Quality of Life: 95.4% of graduates feel their Tri-County Technical College experience improved the quality of their lives with annual ratings from 94.3% to 98.4% since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 95.3% (Very Effective).

·        Preparation of Technical Workplace Competencies: 98.0% of employers indicate Tri-County Technical College effectively prepares graduates on the technical workplace competencies required for employment in the field with annual ratings from 96.6% to 99.4% since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 99.4% (Very Effective).

·        Preparation of General Workplace Competencies: 98.8% of employers indicate Tri-County Technical College effectively prepares graduates on the general workplace competencies required for employment in the field with annual ratings from 98.3% to 100.0% since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 100.0% (Very Effective).

·        Preparation for Employment in Field: 97.5% of employers indicate Tri-County Technical College adequately prepares its graduates for employment in the field with annual ratings from 96.3% to 98.9% since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 97.5% (Very Effective).

·        Work Attitude of Graduates: 96.8% of employers rate the work attitude of Tri-County's graduates as very adequate compared to other workers with similar jobs with annual ratings from 95.2% to 99.4% since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 96.2% (Very Effective).

·        Work Quality of Graduates: 97.1% of employers rate the work quality of Tri-County's graduates as very adequate compared to other workers with similar jobs with annual ratings from 95.5% to 98.9% since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 98.1% (Very Effective).

·        On-the-job Performance of Graduates: 97.2% of employers rate the on-the-job performance of Tri-County's graduates as adequate or very adequate compared to other workers with similar jobs with annual ratings from 96.0% to 98.9% since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 97.5% (Very Effective).

·        Hiring Tri-County Technical College Graduates: 99.8% of employers indicate they would consider hiring another Tri-County Technical College graduate with annual ratings from 99.4% to 100.0% since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 100.0% (Very Effective).

Major Initiatives: Based upon the institutional effectiveness findings for majors or concentrations, the following initiatives have or are being implemented.

·     During the 2005-06 academic year, all programs in the Business and Public Services Division conducted an in-depth review/analysis of associate degree and certificate programs with input from faculty, students, employers, and advisory committee members. The analysis resulted in the development of 5 new certificate programs that will be offered beginning in fall 2007.

 

·     The Textiles Management Technology program curriculum in the Industrial and Engineering Technology Division was modified and the name was changed to Industrial Supervision Technology. The program allows for the student to select a technical specialty. The change, which became effective in fall 2006, has already increased program enrollment.

 

·     The Health Education Division acquired human patient simulators, surgical simulators, and canine simulators to enhance teaching effectiveness by providing a completely safe clinical environment in which students can practice procedures before working with clients and patients.

•·        The College has implemented on-line registration for all programs of study.

 

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  1. Academic Advising: This component was last submitted to the Commission on Higher Education in 2004. Based on the schedule of reporting for this component, a report on general education will be submitted next to the Commission on Higher Education in 2008.

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  1. Achievement of Students Transferring from Two- to Four-Year Institutions: This component was last submitted to the Commission on Higher Education in 2006. Based on the schedule of reporting for this component, a report on general education will be submitted next to the Commission on Higher Education in 2008.

Assessment Methodology: The assessment consists of annually surveying Associate in Arts and Associate in Science graduates on Corporate & Community Education status, university transfer academic competencies, instruction, instructors, and preparation for transferring to another college/university program. Since 2001-2002, 279 Associate in Arts and Associate in Science graduates have provided feedback.

Major Findings: The following summarizes the major findings of the assessment of achievement of students transferring from two- to four-year institutions. Effectiveness Ratings of 1.00 up to 2.00 or 0% up to 85% equal Very Ineffective, 2.00 up to 3.00 or 85% up to 90% equal Ineffective, 3.00 up to 4.00 or 90% up to 95% equal Effective, and 4.00 to 5.00 or 95% to 100% equal Very Effective.

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    1. Preparation of University Transfer Academic Competencies: Graduates rate their preparation on the university transfer academic competencies as very good. The annual ratings range from 4.0 to 4.18. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 4.04 (Very Effective).

    2. Instruction: Graduates rate instruction as very good. The annual ratings range from 4.11 to 4.23. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 4.11 (Very Effective).
    3. Instructors: Graduates rate instructors as very good. The annual ratings range from 4.19 to 4.36. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 4.21 (Very Effective).

    4. Preparation for Transferring: 97.5% of graduates indicate Tri-County Technical College adequately prepared them for their new program with annual ratings from 93.3% to 100.0%. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 100.0% (Very Effective).

    5. Satisfaction with Educational Experience: 98.2% of graduates indicate satisfaction with their educational experience at Tri-County Technical College with annual ratings from 93.1% to 100.0%. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 93.1% (Very Effective).

    6. Acceptance into Two- and Four-Year Institutions: 70.9% of graduates were accepted and enrolled in another college/university program, 1.0% had applied and were waiting for notification of acceptance, 0.7% had applied and were not accepted, 21.6% had not applied into another college/university program, and 5.7% did not provide information on Corporate & Community Education status.

    7. Transferring to Two- and Four-Year Institutions: 83.8% of graduates accepted into another college/university program were accepted into a four-year college/university program and 16.2% were accepted into a two-year college program.

Major Initiatives: Based upon the institutional effectiveness findings for majors or concentrations, the following initiatives have or are being implemented.

·       The College, in collaboration with Clemson University, has developed the Clemson University Bridge Program. This program is a competitive academic-enhancement transfer program available by invitation only from Clemson University. It provides a strong academic freshman year experience at Tri-County Technical College, located only a few miles from the Clemson campus. The program is centered on targeted advising, academic support and a seamless transition to Clemson University upon successful completion of academic requirements.

•·        The Arts and Sciences Division in collaboration with Clemson University aligned curriculum for the offering of general education courses to students of the Bridge to Clemson Program. The collaboration included the development of 15 new courses.

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5.      Procedures for Student Development: This component was last submitted to the Commission on Higher Education in 2003. Based on the schedule of reporting for this component, a report on procedures for student development will be submitted next to the Commission on Higher Education in 2007.

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  1. Library Resources: Tri-County Technical College has been assessing library resources since 1994-1995. The following presents a summary of the results for 2005. Based on the four-year schedule of reporting for this component, a report on library resources will be submitted next to the Commission on Higher Education in 2009.
     

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  1. Technologically Skilled Workforce: Tri-County Technical College has been assessing technologically skilled workforce since 1999-2000. Based on the schedule of reporting for this component, a report on technologically skilled workforce will be submitted next to the Commission on Higher Education in 2007. The following presents a summary of the results for 2006.

Assessment Methodology: Technical proficiency is assessed in academic programs as described in the Majors and Concentration reporting component. Additional assessment techniques include the surveying of Corporate & Community Education students and employers on the quality and effectiveness of course content and materials, instructors, instruction, program development, and skill acquisition. Since 2001-2002, more than 25,000 students and 122 employers have provided feedback.

Major Findings: The following summarizes the major findings of the assessment of technologically skilled workforce. Effectiveness Ratings of 1.00 up to 2.00 or 0% up to 85% equal Very Ineffective, 2.00 up to 3.00 or 85% up to 90% equal Ineffective, 3.00 up to 4.00 or 90% up to 95% equal Effective, and 4.00 to 5.00 or 95% to 100% equal Very Effective.

·        Course Content and Materials: Students rate the course content and training materials as very effective. The annual effectiveness ratings range from 4.47 to 4.57 since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 4.57 (Very Effective).

·        Instructors: Students rate the instructors as very effective. The annual ratings range from 4.63 to 4.73 since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 4.73 (Very Effective).

·        Satisfaction with Courses: Students indicate satisfaction with their courses at Tri-County Technical College with annual ratings from 98.1% to 99.0% since first measured in 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 98.6% (Very Effective).

·        Instruction: Employers rate the quality of instruction as very good. The annual ratings range from 4.47 to 4.70 since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 4.70 (Very Effective).

·        Program Development: Employers rate the development of programs for meeting their needs as very good. The annual ratings range from 4.23 to 4.70 since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 4.37 (Very Effective).

·        Training Needs: Employers rate the effectiveness of the programs in meeting their training needs as very good. The annual ratings range from 4.17 to 4.57 since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 4.43 (Very Effective).

·        Satisfaction with Training: 97.5% of employers indicate satisfaction with the training provided by Tri-County Technical College with annual ratings from 94.4% to 100.0% since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 100% (Very Effective).

·        Additional Training Needs: 99.2% of employers indicate they would consider using Tri-County Technical College for meeting future training needs with annual ratings from 96.6% to 100.0% since 2001-2002. The rating for 2005-2006 equaled 100% (Very Effective).

Major Initiatives: Based upon the institutional effectiveness findings for technologically skilled workforce, the following initiatives have or are being implemented.

•·        The Corporate & Community Education Division added Smartboard technology to three classrooms in the Industrial and Business Development Center to support a wide array of occupational training programs.

 

•·        In cooperation with the Industrial & Engineering Technology Division, the World Class Training Center received funding of a proposal to AdvanceSC with which to establish the Institute for Manufacturing Competitiveness.

 

•·        In cooperation with the Industrial & Engineering Technology Division, the World Class Training Center received funding of a proposal to the Workforce Investment Board to provide customized training for entry level employees.

 

•·        The Health Care Department received funding of a proposal to the Foundation for Geriatric Education to enhance a variety of healthcare career training programs.

 

•·        BTC developed the COST Program, Customized Office/Computer Skills Training Program to provide high-quality, affordable computer and office skills training to business, industry, government, non-profits, and other organizations to upgrade the skills of the area?s workforce to maximize productivity.

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