CONTACT:  JULIA LEE, 646-1707 OR jlee42@tctc.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                           6/12/2019

 

PENDLETON --- Job opportunities are plentiful today for individuals with the basic skills needed for in-demand jobs as power line workers and heavy equipment operators.

Tri-County Technical College will offer its first Power Line Worker/Heavy Equipment Operator training class beginning July 16.  The seven-week class will be held weekdays from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

Scholarship are available and individuals are urged to apply and to attend an Open House at the College to learn more.  For more information, contact Julia Lee, training coordinator (transportation) for the Corporate and Community Education Division, jlee42@tctc.edu, 864-646-1707.

The first two weeks of training will be held at the Anderson QuickJobs Center, across from Tri-County’s Anderson Campus. This National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) pre-requisite training will be taught by instructor Mike Sanders.  This curriculum includes American Heart Association/CPR First Aid training and courses in NCCER core.

The next few weeks of class will involve hands-on field training when students will learn how to operate five pieces of heavy equipment.

Those interested in heavy equipment and power line worker jobs will be in the same pre-requisite class and at the end of the Core training, they break out into either heavy equipment or power line training, according to their personal preference and physical abilities.  Jamie Guthrie will be the power line instructor.

At the end of the class, a rodeo will be held, whereby potential employers will visit the site to observe students’ skills set and competencies.   Students can connect with employers and will be able to interview for a job.  “This is a way to get students in front of future employers who can see they have the skills they need,” said Sanders.  “With the amount of heavy highway construction going on in our state, there is a tremendous need for heavy equipment operators.  The same goes for power line workers.  These are lucrative fields and the jobs are not temporary,” added Sanders.

Trained individuals can go to work immediately, he added.

Representatives from the utility industry agree the need is now for the program which will serve as a pipeline to provide qualified applicants for these in-demand power line worker jobs.

All are looking for new hires – ranging from 4 to 111 -- over the next several years and agree this program is a great way to help meet that demand.

Graduates of the line worker program would come in with basic skills and would continue to build on them through the companies’ apprenticeship programs.

“Middle skills jobs, like the new certification power line worker program, are in high demand. Tri County Technical College offers multiple middle skill development programs to obtain national certifications that can lead to employment,” added Dr. Rick Cothran, dean of the Corporate and Community Education Division at Tri-County. 

 “We are always looking for new ways to change the dynamics of persons’ lives,” said Dr. Cothran.

The Power Line Worker Training program is funded by a grant from the South Carolina Technical College Foundation, made possible by Duke Energy. 

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